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Thread: Winter Stripers in CT

  1. #1
    Senior NBS Member wishinone's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Winter Stripers in CT

    Found this on you tube posted today by Leon Syivester.

    http://youtu.be/6q5KtccKsRI







    Last edited by Brad; 05-29-2014 at 03:22 PM.
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  2. #2
    NBS Angling Addict MisterBoots's Avatar
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    Thanks

    Wishin1,

    Thanks for the simply awesome share. That video absolutely got me fired up bro! A couple more weeks and can't wait to hit up smallies and stripers in the river!

    Tight lines and again welcome aboard NBSS,



    Boots
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  3. #3
    "Possum"   Brad's Avatar
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    Wicked video. Not sure how I missed it before.
    "NO CACHE" 2002 Carolina Skiff 238 Semi-V w/Mercury 125 HP


  4. #4

    Connecticut Fishing

    Hi,

    My name is Mike and I am looking for anyone who might be willing to take me out on their boat fishing. I would pay for the gas/beer/food etc. I just want to start going out and see if it is something I like and will do enough to maybe buy a boat of my own. I usually just go out on the big, tourist type fishing boats like mijoy, etc.

    I live in Bristol CT, am 50 yrs old and work as a Advisor/Counselor at a college.

    Not sure if anyone would be interested in this, just throwing it out there!

    Thanks!
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  5. #5
    Some of the wintering locations are pretty well known like the upper reaches of the Thames river. The bass can be so thick there that many have mistaken the bass for the bottom on their fish finders. I suspect the newer “Chirp” technology will resolve that issue however.



    The last extreme cold winter resulted in some of our rivers trapping large numbers of bass in ice of which did cause a die off. See link;
    http://www.nhregister.com/general-ne...iver-tributary.
    Not sure if anyone knows for sure how much damage was done but dead bass were found by the hundreds in the Connecticut River triutary. While most of bass caught are rats, in the Norwich area, one could expect a few bass going over 28 inches to be mixed in but you are fishing in fresh water. There used to be tagging programs carried out there since it was so easy to catch large amounts of bass, gets their specs, tag them, and release them.



    I have always been surprised that few NBS members have shown much interest in posting the goings on at the upper reaches of the Thames River especially in the early spring. Should I drive into Norwich area on business, I would always look for the boats doing their thing and usually I can spot a few of them. I guess either the fishing has dropped off radically because of the lack of postings, or perhaps the locals just would like to try to keep things hushed up.
    "Success seems to be largely a matter of hanging on after others have let go" by William Feather

  6. #6
    NBS Angling Addict cjtuna's Avatar
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    Not trying to be negative, but wouldn't it be a good idea NOT to fish for these fish? They are so vulnerable between the cold and slow metabolism with limited forage, and I am sure release mortality is higher than warmer water. At a time when so many are worried about bass stocks and we are cutting harvest to 1 fish per day, it seems it would be a good idea to close fishing Dec 1 - April 1 in New England and save a few thousand fish from dying in these rivers.
    That being said, it is always cool to see that many fish and I realize many guys use this fishery to "get through the winter." Just a thought...
    chris J
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  7. #7
    NBS Extreme Angler fishcounterbob's Avatar
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    It was not so long ago when our own DEP did not recognise the fact that not only that these fish were wintering over but also recognising the fact that there is spawning going on.

    IMHO ever since the striper moritorium occured man has disrupted mother nature's balance they have taken credit for a researgence of one specie with out considering the ramifications. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

    Look at our current spiney dogfish debacleAnyone taking credit for the disproportunate population of doggies and the damage they continue to do? The range and quantity of these preditors has surpassed anything I have witnessed. A collossal blunder on the part of the fishcrats. They were so thrilled they exceeded expectation after 5 years of "protection" and the continuation of the protection for the duration of the ten year stock rebuilding program. Kudo's to the scientist that mistakenly couldn't properly ID male and female of the species. An 8-1 ID ratio of m/f has a dramatic and inverse result from a f/m ratio.

    Luckily, as some are already noticing, we seem to be witnessing an inprovement.
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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by fishcounterbob View Post
    It was not so long ago when our own DEP did not recognise the fact that not only that these fish were wintering over but also recognising the fact that there is spawning going on.

    IMHO ever since the striper moritorium occured man has disrupted mother nature's balance they have taken credit for a researgence of one specie with out considering the ramifications. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

    Look at our current spiney dogfish debacleAnyone taking credit for the disproportunate population of doggies and the damage they continue to do? The range and quantity of these preditors has surpassed anything I have witnessed. A collossal blunder on the part of the fishcrats. They were so thrilled they exceeded expectation after 5 years of "protection" and the continuation of the protection for the duration of the ten year stock rebuilding program. Kudo's to the scientist that mistakenly couldn't properly ID male and female of the species. An 8-1 ID ratio of m/f has a dramatic and inverse result from a f/m ratio.

    Luckily, as some are already noticing, we seem to be witnessing an inprovement.
    Very well said and you could throw in the smooth dogfish as well although I still can't tell the difference between f/m either, but what a pain in the #@#$%^ they have cause! It is well beyond my understanding just how far the damage extends that this specie/s has done.
    "Success seems to be largely a matter of hanging on after others have let go" by William Feather

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by cjtuna View Post
    Not trying to be negative, but wouldn't it be a good idea NOT to fish for these fish? They are so vulnerable between the cold and slow metabolism with limited forage, and I am sure release mortality is higher than warmer water. At a time when so many are worried about bass stocks and we are cutting harvest to 1 fish per day, it seems it would be a good idea to close fishing Dec 1 - April 1 in New England and save a few thousand fish from dying in these rivers.
    That being said, it is always cool to see that many fish and I realize many guys use this fishery to "get through the winter." Just a thought...
    chris J
    I believe the exact converse is true when it comes when it comes to water temperature. Most of the time, you will see bass on the surface doing their death dance during the hot days days of summer when the carbon dioxide builds up quickly in their blood stream. The tagging programs I saw on You Tube were done with heavy tackle, with hundreds of rat bass being taken and tagged, and released. In addition, most of these fish are caught in shallow water, so it is not a long drawn out affair.

    Lastly, I cannot ever recall keeping a bass for eating in the years gone by anyway. Sorry for being such an old timer, but things like coming back with a half bushel of clams and a dozen flats would tickle my taste buds more than keeping a bass I caught by live lining an Alewife (I was more of springtime type rather than a wintertime nut anyway). The Thames River was not always as clean as it is now. When I first fished it in the sixties, it sort of reminded me of Jamaica Bay where I was from, and many of the bass there took on a kerosene flavor. It probably is more mental than anything else, but I still shy away from eating any bass caught upstream, in coves, or near or around cities.
    Last edited by Scup; 12-18-2014 at 03:38 AM.
    "Success seems to be largely a matter of hanging on after others have let go" by William Feather

  10. #10
    NBS Angling Addict cjtuna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scup View Post
    I believe the exact converse is true when it comes when it comes to water temperature. Most of the time, you will see bass on the surface doing their death dance during the hot days days of summer when the carbon dioxide builds up quickly in their blood stream. The tagging programs I saw on You Tube were done with heavy tackle, with hundreds of rat bass being taken and tagged, and released. In addition, most of these fish are caught in shallow water, so it is not a long drawn out affair.

    Lastly, I cannot ever recall keeping a bass for eating in the years gone by anyway. Sorry for being such an old timer, but things like coming back with a half bushel of clams and a dozen flats would tickle my taste buds more than keeping a bass I caught by live lining an Alewife (I was more of springtime type rather than a wintertime nut anyway). The Thames River was not always as clean as it is now. When I first fished it in the sixties, it sort of reminded me of Jamaica Bay where I was from, and many of the bass there took on a kerosene flavor. It probably is more mental than anything else, but I still shy away from eating any bass caught upstream, in coves, or near or around cities.
    Maybe I should be more specific that the release mortality is higher at extremes of LOW and HIGH temps. Therefore, even catch and release carries an unacceptably high mortality and should stop.
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