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Thread: Going sharking for the first time

  1. #1
    Junior Member mako19's Avatar
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    Going sharking for the first time

    This weekend some buddies and I are going sharking off of long island. We have never don this before. I was wondering if any of you experts had any advice on what we should do. We are leaving Shinicock. We are fishermen but never for shark. Any tips or hints whould be great. What type of leaders, bait, techniques should we try.

    By the way the new site looks good.







    Thanks for the help.
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  2. #2
    NBS Extreme Angler Jim's Avatar
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    hi, good luck on your first shark outing....find some clean water..maybe 40 fathoms...couple o bukets of chum...some good gaffs..6 ft wire leader..plenty of pre tied rigs..{in case of blue dogs}..good solid hook baits..macks...fresh bluefish if available..etc...balloons or floats..hooks set 90 ft/60ft/30ft...one pitch bait..sit back and wait.....good luck .jim

  3. #3
    Junior Member mako19's Avatar
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    THANKS FOR THE HELP. I HOPE THE WEATHER HOLDS UP.
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  4. #4
    NBS Member Got Rum?'s Avatar
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    Aside from where and how to fish for sharks, I think its imperative that a few words regarding the danger of handling these animals at boatside be mentioned (this isn't intended to be an exhaustive "how to"). I've been fishing for sharks all my life and have wired hundreds of fish-that being said, I don't take the handling of these creatures lightly and neither should a novice.

    If you don't have an experienced shark fisherman on board, I recommend going with (1) wind-on leaders or (2) shortening the trace of your terminal tackle and going with heavy mono to the straight wire rather than cable (in the event of entanglement, a safety knife will cut through mono quickly whereas multi-strand will require a cable-capable cutter (not easy getting the cable in the jaws of a cutter in an emergency situation). Your wireman should have several cutting devices at his ready and on his person (I wear a release knife, cable cutters, and a pliers with cutters on them).

    Whoever is going to handle the wire when the fish comes to the boat (and this should only be done when the fish is "played out" (not green)) should never take a warp. Hand over hand, with the leader kept over the side of the boat is the way to go. The wireman must communicate with the angler-have the angler back off the drag, stay square to the fish, and watch the tip of the rod to be certain it doesn't get wrapped. If the fish isn't ready and decides to head for the bottom, the wireman should yell "dump" so that the angler isn't surprised by the sudden surge of power (backing off the drag will prevent the angler from being jolted and will prevent a break off).

    For novices, I wouldn't recommend trying to remove the hook or cut the trace close to the jaws (trust me, having released as many sharks as I have, I don't get close to their business end no matter how played out they seem to be). You are better off bringing bolt cutters on board and cutting the trace from a distance.

    Should it be a fish that you are taking, have the gaffman set up behind the wireman (toward the tail end of the fish). The wireman should call the shot. I recommend having the first shot taken at the gills, followed by a second shot towards the tail-the quicker you can get the fish's motor out of the water, the sooner you'll have control over the fish (if the shark is a thresher, take extreme caution with its tail-they use it to stun fish and won't think twice of taking your head off with it). If you're using flying gaffs, be certain the tail gaffer has tied off behind the first gaffer and the first gaffer has cleared before hitting the fish-you don't want gaff lines crossed with someone caught between them and the gunnel.

    Good luck out there and play it safe.
    Still searchin for my lost shaker of salt.

  5. #5
    NBS Extreme Angler Jim's Avatar
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    thanks tony, that is great info...i cant type that much.........lol..jim 8)

  6. #6
    Senior NBS Member gerg's Avatar
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    The 40 fathom curve is a haul and a half and not necessary, especially for a newbie. The horns are a popular destination and well within range of most boats at 35 fathoms, and you would likely have good luck on the 30 fathom line as well. You probably don't even need to go too far past block at this point.

    I just went to the 40 last saturday, just west of little fishtails and again at the ranger. We saw life, but the long run didn't pay off other than for mental health. It certainly isn't anything I would recommend to a first timer.
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